Archbishop Carroll High School

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English » English Department

English Department

Graduation Goals

Students will be able to:

 

* Analyze and interpret structure, style and use of language across a wide range of genres to discern meaning and theme; evaluate, connect and appreciate texts in relation to their own and others’ experiences

 

* Write insightful essays across a wide range of styles including expository, descriptive, personal and research; utilize the writing process of pre-writing, drafting and editing into an error-free essay that demonstrates command of conventional English; incorporate these same skills in their speaking and listening

 

* Demonstrate vocabulary acquisition skills including dictionary use, context clues, and word elements; incorporate new vocabulary into writing and speaking

 

 

English Courses

110 Honors English I            1 credit

Students will accomplish the work outlined in the English 1 course description. They will be expected to analyze texts of some complexity. Honors students are expected to complete more work than students in English 1, with greater independence and self-monitoring.


111 English I                1 credit

English 1 students set a foundation for college-ready skills in reading, writing, thinking, and presenting with poise. Students learn to be learners, practicing the skill of knowing what’s ‘tricky’ about an assignment or text, and then choosing appropriate strategies for fixing their confusion. Students work on analysis: breaking texts, graphs, and sentences, into key parts, then explaining how parts work together. In speeches, poetry and projects, students share their ideas on course materials, personal experiences and values. With essays, students organize with MLA formatting and defend ideas with textual evidence.


117 Textual Analysis 1         1 credit

With a focus on young adult and teen literature, this course cultivates the skills a good reader must have, such as: finding main ideas of texts, determining cause and effect, problems and attempted solutions, and identifying and explaining the author's purpose. Writing units aim to help sharpen grammar, syntax and vocabulary development in persuasive, informational, and analytical writing.


120 Honors Literary Analysis    1 credit

This concentrated study of the various genres of literature emphasizes the interpretation of essays, short stories, poetry, novels and drama. Grammar is reviewed primarily to prepare students for successful performance on standardized tests and for proficiency in written and oral assignments. Composition is literature based. Vocabulary study is structured and integrated into personal usage and literary projects. Honors students are expected to read extensively outside of class, develop strong writing in a variety of styles, and participate actively in class discussions emanating from their reading and writing.


121 Literary Analysis        1 credit

Sophomores learn to read with appreciation the various genres of literature, including essays, short stories, poetry, biography, novels, and drama. Grammar is reviewed, primarily to prepare students for successful performances on standardized tests and for proficiency in written and oral assignments. Students practice skills necessary to write five-paragraph themes, usually related to literary study. Vocabulary study is structured and incorporated into all areas of the course throughout the year.


118 Textual Analysis 2        1 credit

Students in this course continue developing vocabulary, fluency and comprehension in increasingly sophisticated texts. Students develop reading strategies for literary texts as well as content area reading.


131 American Literature        1 credit

Students will examine themes of social justice as they are represented in American Literature. The concept of American ideals, as represented by historical works, will be compared to contemporary texts which illuminate problems within society today. Students will be empowered to construct developed essays and presentations, crafting their own theses and supporting evidence, in order to analyze the connections between an author’s craft and the larger social implications of a work. Vocabulary development will be grounded in the texts being read but will also focus on preparation for the SAT and ACT. Students will refine research skills and the use of MLA citation format.


180 I.B. English 11            1 credit

This course will be a rigorous, detailed study of literature from a variety of time periods, cultures, and genres. Instruction will focus on analyzing the author’s craft, use of technique, literary styles, and structure. The complexity of the texts chosen will challenge students to develop their skills as thinkers by requiring them to synthesize multiple elements of a text to make connections between the text, themselves, and society.

Expressing these conclusions in a variety of formats, including written work and both individual and group presentations, will foster each student’s growth as a communicator. Works studied in semester one will examine the theme of racism; semester two works will examine narrative technique and themes in world literature.

Departmental approval required.

This course is required for is for I.B. Diploma Candidates


182 I.B. English 12            1 credit

Semester 1 of this course includes a detailed study of works by Shakespeare and other authors, using a variety of critical lenses such as New Critical, Feminist, and Psychological analysis. Semester 2 will focus on narrative structures in prose fiction. As in I.B. English 11, instruction will focus on analyzing the author’s craft, the use of technique, literary styles, and structure. The complexity of the texts chosen will challenge students to develop their skills as thinkers by requiring them to synthesize multiple elements of a text in order and make connections between the text, themselves, and society.

Expressing these conclusions in a variety of formats, including written work and both individual and group presentations, will foster each student’s growth as a communicator.

Departmental approval required.

This course is required for is for I.B. Diploma Candidates


144 World Literature        1 credit

Though we live in countries with borders, we are more intricately connected than ever in a world confronted by waves of dramatic changes: in cultures, languages, politics, economics, and spiritualities. Carroll seniors will need to be wise and agile in navigating these changes. They will read literature written in voices from around the world, voices that are different from their own, so as to understand and navigate these differences. Students will read literature from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas, with an emphasis on change—and the traumas and triumphs it carries.


168 College Writing 1        ½ credit

The objective of this course is to prepare the college-bound student for the writing demands of colleges today. Organization, mechanics and methodology of expository composition will be covered in depth. Each student will be given the opportunity to strengthen his/her individual skills and to evaluate the work of others in the learning process.


174 College Writing 2        ½ credit

This course allows students who have completed College Writing to continue honing their essay writing skills in preparation for college.

Prerequisite: College Writing 1


171 Creative Writing 1        ½ credit

This course seeks to tap into the creative energies of students by engaging them in the writing of poetry, short stories, personal reflective writing, and autobiography. Students will be expected to write, to share their writing with the class, and to critique constructively the writing of others. The class will also seek to connect students with the world of publishing. Students will submit various pieces of their own writing for publication.


175 Creative Writing 2        ½ credit

This course allows students who have completed Creative Writing to continue deepening the craft of poetry or short story writing. These students will create a portfolio of their work, with an eye to publication and reading their work in public in the community.

Prerequisite: Creative Writing 1


178 Shakespeare            ½ credit

Through the reading, both as texts and through performances, and the viewing of performances and film adaptations, we will tackle the question "Is Shakespeare relevant?" and learn to love him for both his beautifully written texts and his brilliant examples of the core topics of love, loyalty, power, ambition, and so much more! Many things have changed since Shakespeare's time, but the feelings people have, their schemes and dreams, their thirst for power or love or both, and their essential goodness or badness has transcended time. Shakespeare captured so many  emotions, showed us how those emotions developed, and then demonstrated the (often tragic) results, and that's why he has the somewhat unique ability to have the audience (and readers) so wrapped up in what is happening that they are left amazed.